Lotus Elan

Bleedin' the Bloody Clutch

PostPost by: tcsoar » Tue Jan 21, 2014 1:20 pm

Hi,

I used Johns method, although once I see no more air passing through the tube I take the end out of the master cylinder and put it into a jar. I then pump the pedal some more while topping up the resevoir to fill the system with fresh fluid.

Chris.
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PostPost by: john.p.clegg » Tue Jan 21, 2014 1:26 pm

Thank you Chris...

John :wink:
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PostPost by: mbell » Tue Jan 21, 2014 8:18 pm

That's a good idea John, never thought of that.

Might have to give that a go, currently have a half bled clutch as it was leaking air in via the bleed nipple thread when I was using a vacuum bleeder. I'll need to sort the thread first of course.
'73 +2 130/5 RHD, now on the road and very slowly rolling though a "restoration"
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PostPost by: prezoom » Thu Jan 23, 2014 3:56 am

I'll try this one more time. You guys are working way too hard. The Speed Bleed looks like a regular bleed nipple, but it has a permanent sealer on the threads that go in the slave cylinder/caliper. When loosened, no air will get pulled back into the cylinder/caliper past the threads. The bleeder has an internal spring loaded valve that allows fluid to pass through the bleeder when the bleeder is loosened and the pedal is pushed. But closes when the pressure against it is removed. By fitting a clear piece of tubing, with a loop above the bleeder and then putting the open end of the tube in a container with the open end submerged in some brake fluid, when the pedal is pushed a few times, and shortly the loop will be filled with fluid and when you cannot see any air in the loop, there should be no more air in the system. Just make sure the open end of the tubing always stays submerged in the fluid.

The really good part is, the pedal does not have to be held down and the bleeder tightened before releasing the pedal. The sealed threads and the spring loaded valve, prevents air from re-entering the system, or pulling fluid back from the tubing. Even better, a second person is not needed, to perform the usual round of up/down instructions, and you do not need to be under the car opening and closing the bleeder. In fact, the pressure on the pedal is so light, you can push the pedal with your hand just by reaching through the door. No getting back in the car. Just keep an eye on the fluid level in master cylinder reservoir and it is possible to see the loop on a LHD car, without getting too far under the car to check for air in the loop. When you cannot see any air in the loop, just tighten the bleeder, and pull off the tube. For years, I have fitted these bleeders to just about every car I have raced or restored. For the minor amount of money spent for the bleeders, the peace of mind and the 15 or so minutes it takes to bleed all four wheels it is well worth it. Plus, my wife likes it better than I do, as I do not have to get her out to the garage to do the pumping routine. You don't have to round up a second person. The bleeders are 3/8 UNF (24), and come in two lengths. They also come in metric, with several different sizes and thread options.

Rob Walker
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Rob Walker
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1964 Sabra GT
1964 Elva Mk4T Coupe (awaiting restoration)
1965 Ford Falcon Ranchero, 302,AOD,9",rack and pinion,disc,etc,etc,etc
1954 Nash Healey LeMans Coupe

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PostPost by: alan » Thu Jan 23, 2014 8:23 am

rob,
imho
if you use your method we need to be sure that the bled nipple is at the top position to pump out the
air pocket.
if my method is used the suppy from the master cylinder is in the top position.
Alan.B
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PostPost by: prezoom » Thu Jan 23, 2014 7:18 pm

Alan,

You are correct. I always place the bleeder at the highest position. In 45 years of bleeding brakes on mostly race cars, I am looking for the easiest and quickest method, as brakes/clutch get bled after every session. Air goes up, simple as that.

Another method on the Elan's clutch slave cylinder, would be to replace the bleeder on the slave cylinder with a section of braided Teflon line from the upper port. Then use the bleeder in the coupling fitting on the end of new line, after running the line up into the engine compartment. You may have to get creative with how you route the line, to keep it away from hot parts, but having the bleeder out from under the car, means you don't even have to get down on your knees. There are lots of different fittings available to route the line away from the exhaust.

I have even made a tool that prevents the clutch's slave cylinder piston from coming out of the cylinder, if the little rod has not yet been installed and you happen to hit the clutch pedal accidentally. I use it when I slip the slave cylinder out of the bell housing, when removing the engine. Eliminates bleeding the clutch after putting the engine back in.

What ever works in your case. Just offering an alternate method.

Rob Walker
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Rob Walker
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50-0315N
1964 Sabra GT
1964 Elva Mk4T Coupe (awaiting restoration)
1965 Ford Falcon Ranchero, 302,AOD,9",rack and pinion,disc,etc,etc,etc
1954 Nash Healey LeMans Coupe

Lotus is a life sentence with no parole
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PostPost by: john.p.clegg » Thu Jan 23, 2014 10:03 pm

Go on then Rob,let's have a piccy of your tool...

John :wink:
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PostPost by: prezoom » Mon Jan 27, 2014 10:39 pm

John,

Seems the camera has the same flu as I have. The camera and the computer are not communicating. Basically, what I did was take a round piece of metal, just slightly smaller in diameter than the bore of the slave cylinder. It is long enough to stick out of the cylinder just a little with the piston fully depressed. To the end of round metal I welded a flange, about 1/4" thick, with a threaded hole, 1/4NC. the hole lines up with the loop on the slave cylinder where the spring from the throw out arm attaches. I stick a 1/4" bolt through the loop hole and thread it into the hole in the flange. This prevents the piston from moving, should any pressure or natural gravity allow the piston to move towards the open end of the cylinder. Also keeps the piston in the same relative position as it would be with the slave cylinder assembled to the throw out arm. It will not stop and elephant from stepping on the clutch pedal and forcing the piston out, but it will stop moderate pressure.

Back to caughing and hacking.....

Rob Walker
26-4889
Rob Walker
26-4889
50-0315N
1964 Sabra GT
1964 Elva Mk4T Coupe (awaiting restoration)
1965 Ford Falcon Ranchero, 302,AOD,9",rack and pinion,disc,etc,etc,etc
1954 Nash Healey LeMans Coupe

Lotus is a life sentence with no parole
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PostPost by: john.p.clegg » Tue Jan 28, 2014 6:57 am

Rob

Got it....

"Imitation is the sincerest form off flattery"

John :wink:
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PostPost by: archigator » Sat Feb 01, 2014 1:25 pm

I took Greg's advice and put together his 14" long remote bleeder that lets the line come up vertically up the "fire wall" from the slave cylinder. I've added a clip, Pegasus part # SP 052 to keep the line vertical and away from the exhaust. (Having a Jet-Hot ceramic coating on the exhaust headers may help a bit too.)

1 - 3-14-S-B 14 inch size 3 TFE hose, straight swivel to 3/8" banjo
2 - 3241-3/8 soft copper crush washers
1 - 3242-11 1. Banjo bolt, 3/8-24 single (.78 shank)
1 - 3254-02-03S 1/8 NPT female - 3AN steel adapter
1 - 3266-05 1/8 NPT brake bleeder assembly (2 piece)
1 - SP-052 Support Clamp

It's going in today. No more crawling under the car after this. Now I can bleed the clutch and simultaneously gaze upon my wife's smiling face as I ask her once again (more than once over 26 years of Elan ownership) to help bleed the clutch. "It'll only take a second, dear." :D

As always, thanks for your help everyone. Thank you Greg.

Gary
'71 Sprint FHC
Miami, Florida
Attachments
Elan Clutch Slave Bleeder Hose.jpg and
14" Slave Cylinder Bleeder Hose
SP_052 Nylon Support Clamp for 6mm Tubing.jpg and
Pegasus Part # SP 052 Support Clamp
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PostPost by: gjz30075 » Sat Feb 01, 2014 8:23 pm

You're welcome! :D Hmm, I like that support clamp......

Greg Z
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PostPost by: alan » Sun Feb 02, 2014 1:09 pm

gary,
i like your method, why not
Alan.B
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